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Young Adult Books M-Z

The YA book market is exploding and LGBTQ+ titles are a major reason because of their diversity, honesty, and creativity. This year’s titles cover varying issues like the effects of generational trauma, racism, or immigration and deportation. Then there are escapist stories like a rom-com set at a music festival or Mexican-inspired epic fantasy featuring a trans semidios. 

Titles are alphabetical by author.


All The Things We Do In The Dark

Something happened to Ava. The curving scar on her face is proof. Ava would rather keep that something hidden–buried deep in her heart and her soul.

But in the woods on the outskirts of town, the traces of someone else’s secrets lie frozen, awaiting Ava’s discovery–and what Ava finds threatens to topple the carefully constructed wall of normalcy that she’s spent years building around her.

Secrets leave scars. But when the secret in question is not your own–do you ignore the truth and walk away? Or do you uncover it from its shallow grave and let it reopen old wounds–wounds that have finally begun to heal?

Saundra Mitchell has been a phone psychic, a denture-deliverer and a layout waxer. She’s dodged trains, endured basic training, and hitchhiked from Montana to California. Mitchell’s work includes Indiana Author Award Winner and Lambda Nominee All the Things We Do In The Dark. She always picks truth; dares are too easy.

Woman with light toned skin gray hair and glasses wearing a gray black and white t-shirt

Out There: Into the Queer New Yonder

Explore new and familiar worlds where the human consciousness can be uploaded into a body on Mars…an alien helps a girl decide if she should tell her best friend how she feels…two teens get stuck in a time loop at a space station…people are forced to travel to the past or the future to escape the dying planet…only a nonbinary person can translate the binary code of a machine that predicts the future…everyone in the world vanishes except for two teen girls who are in love.

This essential and beautifully written collection immerses and surprises with each turn of the page.

Saundra Mitchell has been a phone psychic, a denture-deliverer and a layout waxer. She’s dodged trains, endured basic training, and hitchhiked from Montana to California. Mitchell’s work includes Indiana Author Award Winner and Lambda Nominee All the Things We Do In The Dark. She always picks truth; dares are too easy.

Woman with light toned skin gray hair and glasses wearing a gray black and white t-shirt

Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster

Growing up in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, Maggie Gonzalez has always been a little messy, but she’s okay with that. After all, she has a great family, a goofy group of friends, a rocky romantic history, and dreams of being a music photographer. Tasked with picking an escort for her little sister’s quinceañera, Maggie has to face the truth: that her feelings about her friends–and her future–aren’t as simple as she’d once believed.

As Maggie’s search for the perfect escort continues, she’s forced to confront new (and old) feelings for three of her friends: Amanda, her best friend and first-ever crush; Matthew, her ex-boyfriend twice-over who refuses to stop flirting with her, and Dani, the new girl who has romantic baggage of her own. On top of this romantic disaster, she can’t stop thinking about the uncertainty of her own plans for the future and what that means for the people she loves.

As the weeks wind down and the boundaries between friendship and love become hazy, Maggie finds herself more and more confused with each photo. When her tried-and-true medium causes more chaos than calm, Maggie needs to figure out how to avoid certain disaster–or be brave enough to dive right into it, in Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster.

Andrea Mosqueda is a Chicana writer. She was born and raised in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley. She currently lives in Brooklyn with her partner and works in the publishing industry as an associate editor. When she’s not writing or editing, she can be found doing her makeup, drinking too much coffee, and angsting over children’s media. Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster is her first book.


The Chandler Legacies

Beth Kramer is a “townie” who returns to her sophomore year after having endured a year of tension with her roommate, Sarah.

But Sarah Brunson knows there’s more to that story.

Amanda Priya “Spence” Spencer is the privileged daughter of NYC elites, who is reeling from the realization that her family name shielded her from the same fate as Sarah.

Ramin Golafshar arrives at Chandler as a transfer student to escape the dangers of being gay in Iran, only to suffer brutal hazing under the guise of tradition in the boys’ dorms.

And Freddy Bello is the senior who’s no longer sure of his future but knows he has to stand up to his friends after what happened to Ramin.

At Chandler, the elite boarding school, these five teens are brought together in the Circle, a coveted writing group where life-changing friendships are born–and secrets are revealed. Their professor tells them to write their truths. But is the truth enough to change the long-standing culture of abuse at Chandler? And can their friendship survive the fallout?

Abdi Nazemian is the author of four novels including Like a Love Story, the recipient of a Lambda Literary Award and a Stonewall Honor, and a screenwriter and producer whose vast film and television credits include shows such as Ordinary Joe and films like Call Me By Your Name.

Man with medium skin-tone short dark hair wearing a blue button down shirt

Like a Love Story

It’s 1989 in New York City, and for three teens, the world is changing.

Reza is an Iranian boy who has just moved to the city with his mother to live with his stepfather and stepbrother. He’s terrified that someone will guess the truth he can barely acknowledge about himself. Reza knows he’s gay, but all he knows of gay life are the media’s images of men dying of AIDS.

Judy is an aspiring fashion designer who worships her uncle Stephen, a gay man with AIDS who devotes his time to activism as a member of ACT UP. Judy has never imagined finding romance…until she falls for Reza and they start dating.

Art is Judy’s best friend, their school’s only out and proud teen. He’ll never be who his conservative parents want him to be, so he rebels by documenting the AIDS crisis through his photographs.

As Reza and Art grow closer, Reza struggles to find a way out of his deception that won’t break Judy’s heart–and destroy the most meaningful friendship he’s ever known.

Abdi Nazemian is the author of four novels including Like a Love Story, the recipient of a Lambda Literary Award and a Stonewall Honor, and a screenwriter and producer whose vast film and television credits include shows such as Ordinary Joe and films like Call Me By Your Name.

Man with medium skin-tone short dark hair wearing a blue button down shirt

Under the Udala Trees

Ijeoma comes of age as her nation does. Born before independence, she is eleven when civil war breaks out in the young republic of Nigeria. Sent away to safety, she meets another displaced child and they, star-crossed, fall in love. They are from different ethnic communities. They are also both girls. But when their love is discovered, Ijeoma learns that she will have to hide this part of herself–and there is a cost to living inside a lie.

Chinelo Okparanta’s story collection Happiness, Like Water and her novel Under the Udala Trees have won and been nominated for numerous awards, including the Lambda Literary Award, O. Henry Prize, International Dublin Literary Award, Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Legacy Award, NAACP Image Award, Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, and New York Public Library Young Lions Award, among other honors; her most recent novel, Harry Sylvester Bird, was published by Mariner in July 2022.

Woman with medium skin tone medium length dark hair in braids wearing red lipstick and a white short-sleeved blouse

Anger is a Gift

Moss Jeffries is many things–considerate student, devoted son, loyal friend and affectionate boyfriend, enthusiastic nerd.

But sometimes Moss still wishes he could be someone else–someone without panic attacks, someone whose father was still alive, someone who hadn’t become a rallying point for a community because of one horrible night.

And most of all, he wishes he didn’t feel so stuck.

Moss can’t even escape at school–he and his friends are subject to the lack of funds and crumbling infrastructure at West Oakland High, as well as constant intimidation by the resource officer stationed in their halls. That was even before the new regulations–it seems sometimes that the students are treated more like criminals.

Something will have to change–but who will listen to a group of teens?

When tensions hit a fever pitch and tragedy strikes again, Moss must face a difficult choice: give in to fear and hate or realize that anger can actually be a gift.

Mark Oshiro is the author of YA books Anger Is A Gift, Each Of Us A Desert, and Into The Light, and MG books The Insiders and You Only Live Once, David Bravo. They are the co-author (with Rick Riordan) of the upcoming Percy Jackson novel about Nico and Will.

Man with medium skin tone, and a dark beard mustache wearing a wreath of pink flowers and green leaves on his head, holding a bouquet of pink carnations wearing a black and white sweater with geometric design

Each Of Us A Desert

Xochitl is destined to wander the desert alone, speaking her troubled village’s stories into its arid winds. Her only companions are the blessed stars above and enigmatic lines of poetry magically strewn across dusty dunes.

Her one desire: to share her heart with a kindred spirit.

One night, Xo’s wish is granted–in the form of Emilia, the cold and beautiful daughter of the town’s murderous conqueror. But when the two set out on a magical journey across the desert, they find their hearts could be a match… if only they can survive the nightmare-like terrors that arise when the sun goes down.

Fresh off of Anger Is a Gift’s smashing success, Oshiro branches out into a fantastical direction with their new YA novel, Each of Us a Desert.

Mark Oshiro is the author of YA books Anger Is A Gift, Each Of Us A Desert, and Into The Light, and MG books The Insiders and You Only Live Once, David Bravo. They are the co-author (with Rick Riordan) of the upcoming Percy Jackson novel about Nico and Will.

Man with medium skin tone, and a dark beard mustache wearing a wreath of pink flowers and green leaves on his head, holding a bouquet of pink carnations wearing a black and white sweater with geometric design

The Stars And The Blackness Between Them

Told in two distinct and irresistible voices, Junauda Petrus’s bold and lyrical debut is the story of two black girls from very different backgrounds finding love and happiness in a world that seems determined to deny them both.

Port of Spain, Trinidad. Sixteen-year-old Audre is despondent, having just found out she’s going to be sent to live in America with her father because her strictly religious mother caught her with her secret girlfriend, the pastor’s daughter. Audre’s grandmother Queenie (a former dancer who drives a white convertible Cadillac and who has a few secrets of her own) tries to reassure her granddaughter that she won’t lose her roots, not even in some place called Minneapolis. America have dey spirits too, believe me, she tells Audre.

Minneapolis, USA. Sixteen-year-old Mabel is lying on her bed, staring at the ceiling and trying to figure out why she feels the way she feels–about her ex Terrell, about her girl Jada and that moment they had in the woods, and about the vague feeling of illness that’s plagued her all summer. Mabel’s reverie is cut short when her father announces that his best friend and his just-arrived-from-Trinidad daughter are coming for dinner.

Mabel quickly falls hard for Audre and is determined to take care of her as she tries to navigate an American high school. But their romance takes a turn when test results reveal exactly why Mabel has been feeling low-key sick all summer and suddenly it’s Audre who is caring for Mabel as she faces a deeply uncertain future.

Junauda Petrus is a writer and performance artist of Black-Caribbean descent, working on unceded Dakota land. Her work centers around pleasure, wildness, queerness, Black-diasporic-futurism, and ancestral healing. Her YA novel, The Stars and The Blackness Between Them received a Coretta Scott King Award. She is currently working on her second novel, Black Circus.


Queer, There, and Everywhere

World history has been made by countless lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals–and you’ve never heard of many of them.

Queer author and activist Sarah Prager delves deep into the lives of 23 people who fought, created, and loved on their own terms. From high-profile figures like Abraham Lincoln and Eleanor Roosevelt to the trailblazing gender-ambiguous Queen of Sweden and a bisexual blues singer who didn’t make it into your history books, these astonishing true stories uncover a rich queer heritage that encompasses every culture, in every era.

By turns hilarious and inspiring, the beautifully illustrated Queer, There, and Everywhere is for anyone who wants the real story of the queer rights movement.

Sarah Prager is the author of Queer, There, and Everywhere, Rainbow Revolutionaries, Kind Like Marsha, and A Child’s Introduction to Pride, all about LGBTQ+ history. She has spoken on that topic across eight countries and her writing has also appeared in outlets like the New York Times, National Geographic, and NBC News.

Queer author Sarah Prager is a woman with light skin tone dark shoulder length hair wearing a short sleeved black scoopneck shirt and smiling.

The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School

Sixteen-year-old Yamilet Flores prefers to be known for her killer eyeliner, not for being one of the only Mexican kids at her new, mostly white, very rich Catholic school. But at least here no one knows she’s gay, and Yami intends to keep it that way.

After being outed by her crush and ex-best friend before transferring to Slayton Catholic, Yami has new priorities: keep her brother out of trouble, make her mom proud, and, most importantly, don’t fall in love. Granted, she’s never been great at any of those things, but that’s a problem for Future Yami.

The thing is, it’s hard to fake being straight when Bo, the only openly queer girl at school, is so annoyingly perfect. And smart. And talented. And cute. So cute. Either way, Yami isn’t going to make the same mistake again. If word got back to her mom, she could face a lot worse than rejection. So she’ll have to start asking, WWSGD: What would a straight girl do?

Told in a captivating voice that is by turns hilarious, vulnerable, and searingly honest, The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School explores the joys and heartaches of living your full truth out loud.

Born and raised in Arizona, Sonora Reyes is the author of the forthcoming contemporary young adult novel The Lesbiana’s Guide to Catholic School. They write fiction full of queer and Latinx characters in a variety of genres, with current projects in both kidlit and adult categories. Sonora is also the creator and host of the Twitter chat #QPOCChat, a monthly community-building chat for queer writers of color.

Image of Sonora Reyes, queer author light-medium skin tone dark hair in two braids, big gold hoop earrings and dark red lipstick smiling and wearing a flowered blue, purple and light pink short sleeved collared shirt

When You Call My Name

Tucker Shaw’s When You Call My Name is a heartrending novel about two gay teens coming of age in New York City in 1990 at the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

Film fanatic Adam is seventeen and being asked out on his first date–and the guy is cute. Heart racing, Adam accepts, quickly falling in love with Callum like the movies always promised.

Fashion-obsessed Ben is eighteen and has just left his home upstate after his mother discovers his hidden stash of gay magazines. When he comes to New York City, Ben’s sexuality begins to feel less like a secret and more like a badge of honor.

Then Callum disappears, leaving Adam heartbroken, and Ben finds out his new world is more closed-minded than he thought. When Adam finally tracks Callum down, he learns the guy he loves is very ill. And in a chance meeting near the hospital where Callum is being treated, Ben and Adam meet, forever changing each other’s lives. As both begin to open their eyes to the possibilities of queer love and life, they realize sometimes the only people who can help you are the people who can really see you–in all your messy glory.

A love letter to New York and the liberating power of queer friendship, When You Call My Name is a hopeful novel about the pivotal moments of our youth that break our hearts and the people who help us put them back together.

Tucker Shaw is a writer and editor who first found his family in the East Village in 1991, when he was twenty-three. When You Call My Name, set in downtown New York in the 1990s, is his most personal novel.

Gay author Tucker Shaw with light skin tone and short brown hair and facial stubble wearing a dark gray shirt standing in front of a large window

Tarnished Are The Stars

A secret beats inside Anna Thatcher’s chest: an illegal clockwork heart. Anna works cog by cog — donning the moniker Technician — to supply black market medical technology to the sick and injured, against the Commissioner’s tyrannical laws. Nathaniel Fremont, the Commissioner’s son, has never had to fear the law. Determined to earn his father’s respect, Nathaniel sets out to capture the Technician. But the more he learns about the outlaw, the more he questions whether his father’s elusive affection is worth chasing at all.Their game of cat and mouse takes an abrupt turn when Eliza, a skilled assassin and spy, arrives. Her mission is to learn the Commissioner’s secrets at any cost — even if it means betraying her own heart. When these uneasy allies discover the most dangerous secret of all, they must work together despite their differences and put an end to a deadly epidemic — before the Commissioner ends them first.

Rosiee Thor began her career as a storyteller by demanding to tell her mother bedtime stories instead of the other way around. She spent her childhood reading by flashlight in the closet until she came out. She lives in Oregon with a dog, two cats, and an abundance of plants.

Queer author Rosiee Thor is a woman with purple hair, light skin tone, blue eyes, and glasses.

Cemetery Boys

Yadriel has summoned a ghost, and now he can’t get rid of him.

When his traditional Latinx family has problems accepting his true gender, Yadriel becomes determined to prove himself a real brujo. With the help of his cousin and best friend Maritza, he performs the ritual himself, and then sets out to find the ghost of his murdered cousin and set it free.

However, the ghost he summons is actually Julian Diaz, the school’s resident bad boy, and Julian is not about to go quietly into death. He’s determined to find out what happened and tie off some loose ends before he leaves. Left with no choice, Yadriel agrees to help Julian, so that they can both get what they want. But the longer Yadriel spends with Julian, the less he wants to let him leave.

Aiden Thomas is a trans, Latinx, New York Times bestselling author of young adult novels. Originally from Oakland, California, they now make their home in Portland, OR. Aiden is notorious for not being able to guess the endings of books and movies, and organizes their bookshelves by color.

Latinx, trans author Aiden Thomas has short dark hair and beard and mustache smiling wearing a light purple t-shirt with a rainbow and clouds emblem over their left chest

The Sunbearer Trials

As each new decade begins, the Sun’s power must be replenished so that Sol can keep traveling along the sky and keep the chaotic Obsidian gods at bay. Sol selects ten of the most worthy semidioses to compete in the Sunbearer Trials. The winner carries light and life to all the temples of Reino del Sol, but the loser has the greatest honor of all–they will be sacrificed to Sol, their body melted down to refuel the Sun Stones, protecting the world for another ten years.

Teo, a seventeen-year-old Jade semidiós and the trans son of the goddess of birds, isn’t worried about the Trials . . . at least, not for himself. His best friend, Niya is a Gold semidiós and a shoo-in for the Trials, and while he trusts her abilities, the odds of becoming the sacrifice is one-in-ten.

But then, for the first time in over a century, the impossible happens. Sol chooses not one, but two Jade competitors. Teo, and Xio, the thirteen-year-old child of the god of bad luck. Now they must compete in five trials against Gold opponents who are more powerful and better trained. Worst of all, Teo’s annoyingly handsome ex-best friend and famous semidiós Hero, Aurelio is favored to win. Teo is determined to get himself and his friends through the trials unscathed–for fame, glory, and their own survival.

Aiden Thomas is a trans, Latinx, New York Times bestselling author of young adult novels. Originally from Oakland, California, they now make their home in Portland, OR. Aiden is notorious for not being able to guess the endings of books and movies, and organizes their bookshelves by color.

Latinx, trans author Aiden Thomas has short dark hair and beard and mustache smiling wearing a light purple t-shirt with a rainbow and clouds emblem over their left chest

Spin Me Right Round

All Luis Gonzalez wants is to go to prom with his boyfriend, something his “progressive” school still doesn’t allow. Not after what happened with Chaz Wilson. But that was ages ago, when Luis’s parents were in high school; it would never happen today, right? He’s determined to find a way to give his LGBTQ friends the respect they deserve (while also not risking his chance to be prom king, just saying…).

When a hit on the head knocks him back in time to 1985 and he meets the doomed young Chaz himself, Luis concocts a new plan-he’s going to give this guy his first real kiss. Though it turns out a conservative school in the ’80s isn’t the safest place to be a gay kid. Especially with homophobes running the campus, including Gordo (aka Luis’s estranged father). Luis is in over his head, trying not to make things worse-and hoping he makes it back to present day at all.

David Valdes is a gay, Cuban-American author of nonfiction, fiction, and drama. His work is intersectional, uplifting LGBTQ and BIPOC voices.

Man with medium skin tone wearing glasses with short combed back salt and pepper hair wearing a black t-shirt and a black and white patterned overshirt

Fifteen Hundred Miles From The Sun

Julián Luna has a plan for his life: Graduate. Get into UCLA. And have the chance to move away from Corpus Christi, Texas, and the suffocating expectations of others that have forced Jules into an inauthentic life.

Then in one reckless moment, with one impulsive tweet, his plans for a low-key nine months are thrown–literally–out the closet. The downside: the whole world knows, and Jules has to prepare for rejection. The upside: Jules now has the opportunity to be his real self.

Then Mat, a cute, empathetic Twitter crush from Los Angeles, slides into Jules’s DMs. Jules can tell him anything. Mat makes the world seem conquerable. But when Jules’s fears about coming out come true, the person he needs most is fifteen hundred miles away. Jules has to face them alone.

Jules accidentally propelled himself into the life he’s always dreamed of. And now that he’s in control of it, what he does next is up to him.

Jonny Garza Villa is a Texan, Sagittarius sun, and an author of contemporary young adult novels inspired by their own Tejane & Chicane and queer identities including their debut novel and Pura Belpré Honor Book, Fifteen Hundred Miles from the Sun and the upcoming Ander & Santi Were Here.

Tejane & Chicane person with medium skin tone wearing a blue and white bandana around their head with dark hair. Wearing a green collared over-shirt and a white tshirt with desert in the background

The Grief Keeper

When her brother is murdered, and her little sister’s life is threatened, seventeen-year-old Marisol Morales knows they have no choice but to flee their home in El Salvador, and steal across the US border. Especially because she knows everything is her fault. If she had never fallen for the charms of a beautiful girl named Liliana, Pablo might still be alive, her mother wouldn’t be in hiding and she and Gabi wouldn’t have been caught by ICE.

But they have been caught and their asylum request will most certainly be denied. With truly no options remaining, Marisol jumps at an unusual opportunity to stay in the United States. She’s asked to become a grief keeper, taking the grief of another into her own body to save a life. It’s a risky, experimental study, but if it means Marisol can keep her sister safe, she will risk anything. She just never imagined one of the risks would be falling in love, a love that may even be powerful enough to finally help her face her own crushing grief.

The Grief Keeper is a tender tale that explores the heartbreak and consequences of when both love and human beings are branded illegal.

Alexandra Villasante has always loved telling stories—though not always with words. She has a BFA in Painting and an MA in Combined Media (that’s art school speak for making work out of anything). Born in New Jersey to immigrant parents, Alex has the privilegio of dreaming in both English and Spanish. 

Her debut Young Adult novel, The Grief Keeper, was a Fall 2019 Junior Library Guild Gold Selection and winner of the 2020 Lambda Literary Award for LGBTQ Children’s Literature/Young Adult Fiction. She’s a contributor to two Young Adult short story anthologies, All Signs Point To Yes and Our Shadows Have Claws. When she’s not writing or painting, Alex works for the Highlights Foundation. She lives with her family in the semi-wilds of Pennsylvania.

Lesbian Uruguayan-American author Alexandra Villasante, a woman with light skin tone, green eyes, and dark chin-length hair, with a purple streak in the front.

How To Be Remy Cameron

Everyone on campus knows Remy Cameron. He’s the out-and-proud, super-likable guy who friends, faculty, and fellow students alike admire for his cheerful confidence. The only person who isn’t entirely sure about Remy Cameron is Remy himself. Under pressure to write an A+ essay defining who he is and who he wants to be, Remy embarks on an emotional journey toward reconciling the outward labels people attach to him with the real Remy Cameron within.

From the author of the bestselling novel Running With Lions, a story about overcoming the labels that try to define our lives

Julian Winters is the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Gold Award-winning author of Running With Lions; Junior Library Guild Selections How to Be Remy Cameron and The Summer of Everything; and the multi-starred Right Where I Left You. A self-proclaimed comic book geek and rom-com enthusiast, Julian currently lives outside of Atlanta.

Queer BIPOC author Julian Winters, a man with short dark hair, facial hair, and dark skin tone.

Right Where I Left You

Isaac Martin is ready to kick off summer. His last before heading off to college in the fall where he won’t have his best friend, Diego. Where–despite his social anxiety–he’ll be left to make friends on his own. Knowing his time with Diego is limited, Isaac enacts a foolproof plan: snatch up a pair of badges for the epic comic convention, Legends Con, and attend his first ever Teen Pride. Just him and Diego.

But when an unexpected run-in with Davi–Isaac’s old crush–distracts him the day tickets go on sale, suddenly he’s two badges short of a perfect summer. Even worse, now he’s left making it up to Diego by hanging with him and his gamer buddies. Decidedly NOT part of the original plan. It’s not all bad, though. Some of Diego’s friends turn out to be pretty cool, and when things with Davi start heating up, Isaac is almost able to forget about his Legends Con blunder. Almost. Because then Diego finds out what really happened that day with Davi, and their friendship lands on thin ice. Isaac assumes he’s upset about missing the convention, but could Diego have other reasons for avoiding Isaac?

Julian Winters is the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Gold Award-winning author of Running With Lions; Junior Library Guild Selections How to Be Remy Cameron and The Summer of Everything; and the multi-starred Right Where I Left You. A self-proclaimed comic book geek and rom-com enthusiast, Julian currently lives outside of Atlanta.

Queer BIPOC author Julian Winters, a man with short dark hair, facial hair, and dark skin tone.

Running With Lions

Bloomington High School Lions’ star goalie Sebastian Hughes should be excited about his senior year: His teammates are amazing, and he’s got a coach who doesn’t ask anyone to hide their sexuality. But when his estranged childhood-best-friend Emir Shah shows up at summer training camp, Sebastian realizes the team’s success may end up in the hands of the one guy who hates him. Determined to reconnect with Emir for the sake of the Lions, he sets out to regain Emir’s trust. But to Sebastian’s surprise, sweaty days on the pitch, wandering the town’s streets, and bonding on the weekends spark more than just friendship between them.

Julian Winters is the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Gold Award-winning author of Running With Lions; Junior Library Guild Selections How to Be Remy Cameron and The Summer of Everything; and the multi-starred Right Where I Left You. A self-proclaimed comic book geek and rom-com enthusiast, Julian currently lives outside of Atlanta.

Queer BIPOC author Julian Winters, a man with short dark hair, facial hair, and dark skin tone.

The Summer Of Everything

Adulting is hard. Just ask Wes Hudson.

An avid comic book geek, Wes excels at two things: slacking off and pining after his best friend, Nico. Advice from his friends, ’90s alt-rock songs, and online dating articles aren’t helping much with his secret crush. And his dream job at Once Upon a Page, the local indie bookstore, is threatened when a coffee shop franchise wants to buy the property. To top it off, his family won’t stop pestering him about picking a college major.

When all three problems converge, Wes must face the one thing he’s been avoiding–adulthood.

Julian Winters is the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Gold Award-winning author of Running With Lions; Junior Library Guild Selections How to Be Remy Cameron and The Summer of Everything; and the multi-starred Right Where I Left You. A self-proclaimed comic book geek and rom-com enthusiast, Julian currently lives outside of Atlanta.

Queer BIPOC author Julian Winters, a man with short dark hair, facial hair, and dark skin tone.

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